FPX Nickel Corp (TSX-V: FPX) – One Of The Largest Nickel Mines In Canada?

The FPX Nickel Corp. company logo.
FPX Nickel Corp
  • TSX-V: FPX
  • Shares Outstanding: 163M
  • Share price C$0.15 (14.04.2020)
  • Market Cap: C$25M

Crux Investor recently interviewed Martin Turenne. He is the President & CEO of nickel explorer, FPX Nickel Corp. (TSX-V:FPX).

For investors with foresight and patience, the EV revolution is something that is hard to ignore. Nickel will be at the heart of any such revolution, and Turenne hopes to capitalise on this and make shareholders money.

FPX Nickel’s exclusive focus is on developing the large-scale Decar Nickel District in central British Columbia. The district hosts the Baptiste deposit, which is currently at a PEA stage. FPX Nickel claims it has the potential to become ‘one of the largest nickel mines in Canada.’ This is exciting news, especially coming from a junior.

We’ve got plenty of detailed nickel-related articles on our platform, in addition to numerous nickel interviews. Nickel investors should check them out!

We discuss:

  1. Company Overview
  2. The Team at FPX Nickel
  3. Positioning in the Market
  4. The Project
  5. Cash Position
  6. Updating the PEA
  7. Investors and Their Concerns

Company Website: https://fpxnickel.com/

If you see something in this article that you agree with, or even disagree with, please let us know in the comments below.

Any advice contained in this website is general advice only and has been prepared without considering your objectives, financial situations or needs. You should not rely on any advice and / or information contained in this website or via any digital Crux Investor communications. Before making any investment decision we recommend that you consider whether it is appropriate for your situation and seek appropriate financial, taxation and legal advice.

The FPX Nickel Corp. company logo.

Ardea Resources (ASX: ARL) – A Large Nickel Sulphide Play

The Ardea Resources company logo.
Ardea Resources Ltd
  • ASX: ARL
  • Shares Outstanding: 117M
  • Share price A$0.20 (19.03.2020)
  • Market Cap: A$23.5M

We recently interviewed Andrew Penkethman, CEO of Nickel Sulphide project developer, Ardea Resources (ASX: ARL)

Nickel is a space that has a great deal of potential. Nickel is a key battery metal behind the EV revolution that futuristic investors just can’t stop talking about.

Ardea Resources’ Kalgoorlie Nickel Project looks large and impressive. How does Penkethman plan to monetise this?

We’ve got plenty of detailed nickel-related articles on our platform, in addition to numerous nickel interviews. Nickel investors should check them out!

We discuss:

  1. The Promising Kalgoorlie Nickel Project
  2. The Future Of Nickel, In Light Of The EV Revolution
  3. The Ardea Resources Business Model

Company Website: https://ardearesources.com.au/

If you see something in this article that you agree with, or even disagree with, please let us know in the comments below.

Any advice contained in this website is general advice only and has been prepared without considering your objectives, financial situations or needs. You should not rely on any advice and / or information contained in this website or via any digital Crux Investor communications. Before making any investment decision we recommend that you consider whether it is appropriate for your situation and seek appropriate financial, taxation and legal advice.

The Ardea Resources company logo.

The Volatile Nickel Market: How Can Investors Make Money?

Nickel is a commodity with volatility at its core, but investors just want to know how to navigate this and make themselves a tidy profit. We recently interviewed Mark Selby; he helped shed a light on this.

Why not read a different nickel article once you’ve finished with this one?

History Of The Nickel Market

Nickel has always been much more volatile than other base metals. It is a large market, but not relative to copper, zinc or aluminium.

Since the 1980s, Nickel has been regarded as a boom/bust metal that moves in giant super-cycles:

A nickel price chart from 1989 to 2019.
A chequered history…
Source: InfoMine

In the late 1960s, nickel reached the equivalent of US$50/lb (in today’s dollars).

Contextually, nickel was a hot topic at the time. Rising demand, driven primarily by the Vietnam War, in association with a shortage of supply caused by industrial action at one of Canada’s largest suppliers, Inco, tipped the supply-demand scale of nickel into massive shortages and kicked prices into overdrive.

 This, in turn, led to the Poseidon bubble: a stock market bubble in which the price of Australian mining shares skyrocketed towards the end of 1969 before they crashed in early 1970. The peak was generated by the discovery of a purported promising nickel deposit by ASX-listed nickel producer, Poseidon Nickel, in September of 1969.

While the official Rae Committee report cited trading malpractice as the reason behind this bubble, it serves as a reminder to investors that nickel and volatility have always been joined at the hip.

In the 1980s, nickel went through another supercycle as supply from the Soviet Union dropped off and a new wave of demand emerged from the Asian tigers at that time, Korea and Taiwan.  Unfortunately, the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s led to a complete drop in demand from a country that had been a substantial consumer, which was then followed by the influx of mass quantities of scrap into the market, generated by the collapse.

The most recent nickel crash had ramifications that remain active today. It came off the back off a price rise to over $50,000/t in 2006, as demand globally and from China outstripped supply; traditional nickel industry participants were slow to respond. This led to world warehouse stocks of nickel falling to an extremely low level. Nickel really did lose ‘touch with industrial reality’ during this period, as warned by the biggest nickel producer in the world at the time, Jinchuan Group Ltd.

The Outlook for the future

A picture of a vehicle being charged at a very modern looking EV charging port with a graphical interface in a parking lot. A future EV car concept.
The hype around the EV revolution is growing more and more rapturous.

With a decade of underinvestment in new nickel supply, in addition to the increasingly prominent electric vehicle (EV) thematic, investors can look towards a possible super cycle in the early-to-mid 2020s.

Selby himself believes we have completed “leg one, of what will be three or four legs” in terms of price increase.

But what does the evidence say? Here are some of the current market conditions Selby claims can occur before the dawn of a supercycle:

  1. A period where investment is lacking. There are several large mining companies that own a number of leading nickel assets, but they have chosen to allocate capital to non-nickel projects over the last decade. The majority of existing production has shrunk.
  2. Many of the existing nickel mines are deep underground mines or larger scale processing plants, which means they would not be able to rapidly ramp up production within a 12-month timescale. It would take multiple years to develop them. Projects need to be approved, production needs to begin, then it needs to be ramped up. In many instances, this can take at least 5 years (from announcement to full production capacity). Selby gives several examples of this.
  3. Selby says there needs to be a surge of demand, similar to what was seen in the 1960s when Japanese industry increased nickel consumption exponentially, and the 1980s, when Korea and Taiwan were industrialising. In the 2020s, EVs are the source of price-discovery-related hope. A demand growth of 4% (slower than the 5% growth seen in recent years) and a reasonable forecast of EV demand, nickel supply lead to forecasts that place nickel use between 2018-2030 at a 782000t increase on the previous 12-year period.

Now investors know some of the history, they can make more educated investment decisions in the future. You now know what you’re looking for in the market. If you buy the nickel macro story, it’s time to get busy.

If you see something in this article that you agree with, or even disagree with, please let us know in the comments below.

Any advice contained in this website is general advice only and has been prepared without considering your objectives, financial situations or needs. You should not rely on any advice and / or information contained in this website or via any digital Crux Investor communications. Before making any investment decision we recommend that you consider whether it is appropriate for your situation and seek appropriate financial, taxation and legal advice.

Canada Nickel Corp (TSX-V: CNC) – Here We Go!

The Canada Nickel Company Logo.

We recently sat down with Mark Selby, CEO of nickel explorer, Canada Nickel Corp (TSX-V: CNC).

Nickel is a commodity that appears to be undergoing something of a snowball effect: excitement surrounding the EV revolution is growing more enthusiastic by the day.

We’ve got plenty of detailed nickel-related articles on our platform, in addition to numerous nickel interviews, including with Selby on several occasions.

We discuss:

  1. The Promising Crawford Nickel Sulphide Project
  2. Nickel Outlook For 2020 & Beyond
  3. The Canada Nickel Corp. Business Model

If you see something in this article that you agree with, or even disagree with, please let us know in the comments below.

Any advice contained in this website is general advice only and has been prepared without considering your objectives, financial situations or needs. You should not rely on any advice and / or information contained in this website or via any digital Crux Investor communications. Before making any investment decision we recommend that you consider whether it is appropriate for your situation and seek appropriate financial, taxation and legal advice.

The Canada Nickel Company Logo.

The Nickel Investment Bible

A man walks on water, labelled 'This Article,' and pulls a man, labelled 'Your lacklustre investment decisions,' out of the swirling water. A wooden boat with a nickel on its front and full of men watches on in the background.
A photo of a pile of shards of nickel.
Nickel, nickel, nickel.

Nickel is the fifth most common element on earth. It is ‘a naturally-occurring metallic element with a silvery-white, shiny appearance.’(1) Frankincense, gold and myrrh? No. Nickel, nickel and…

However, if you’re an investor, I doubt you’ll be reading those words with any bubbling sense of excitement; you want to know one thing and one thing only: “how is this big hunk of metal going to make me money?” To realise the full potential of investing in nickel, one must have all the facts available to them.

The following serves as the definitive nickel investment article. It is filled with inside knowledge that the average investor would struggle to access. One shouldn’t consider investing in nickel without reading it. Sit back, relax, and take in all the information you need to make money investing in nickel.

The Commodity

Nickel occurs extensively in the earth’s crust. It had been utilised for thousands of years as meteoric iron before its isolation as an element in 1751 by Swedish scientist Axel Frederik Cronstedt.

Nickle: Key Properties

  • High melting point (1453 °C)
  • Strongly resistant to corrosion and oxidation
  • Can easily form an alloy
  • Magnetic (at room temperature)
  • Malleable and ductile
  • Can be a catalyst
  • Can be deposited via electroplating
  • Harder than iron
  • Good conductor of heat/electricity
  • Average life in many applications of 25-30 years

Applications of Nickel

Nickel is used in a massive 300,000 products, with fields varying from:

  • Engineering/Investment (33%)
  • Transport (20%)
  • Metal Goods (18%)
  • Home Appliances/Electronics (13%)
  • Building/Construction (10%)
  • Others (6%)
  • 70% of nickel’s specific application is alloying with a (minimum 10.5%) chromium to form stainless and heat-resisting steels. These steels form a multitude of items, from household cutlery to medical equipment.
A photo of a stack of stainless steel poles with holes in the centre.
Stainless steel is the main use of nickel.
  • 9% is used in alternative non-ferrous alloys. These have a more specialised application in industrial, aerospace and military equipment.
  • 6% of nickel is made use of in electroplating practices.
  • 6% is used in iron and steel castings and low allow steels.
  • A modern, rapidly growing use of nickel is in batteries for hybrid and fully electric vehicles and stationary storage. However, this still only accounts for 6% of present-day use.
A photo of a Tesla Model 3 battery pack inside a workshop.
A Tesla Model 3 Powerwall.
  • 1% of nickel is consumed to produce coins and for other electronic applications.

The Current Nickel Market: An Outline

The nickel price has demonstrated more volatility than a lion in a butcher shop. Since the 80s, Nickel has been regarded as a boom/bust metal that moves in giant super-cycles. The market saw a quite staggering boom, followed by a dramatic downturn and lingering bust.

Spot Price and Production Analysis

A primary factor behind nickel’s ascension to a high of $54,000/t in May 2007 was the rapid expansion of Chinese demand in the 2000s. However, this soaring price resulted in nickel becoming a victim of its own success. As prices rose, China began seeking more affordable options, thus turning to 200-series stainless steel (1-2% nickel) rather than 300-series stainless steel (8%) nickel; with this compression of demand, spot prices fell through a trap door.

A graph demonstrating nickel price in USD/lb against the date from Jan 3 1989 to Jan 3 2019.
A spot price chart that moves as frenetically as a broken elevator.

When nickel prices were high, a new source of cheaper nickel was developed: nickel pig iron, a version of nickel created using low-grade laterite ores and blast/electric furnaces. Nickel pig iron now accounts for 35% of international nickel supply, up from ≈0 in 2006.

The decrease in Chinese demand and oversupply combined to push the spot price of nickel off a cliff edge. Brief increases in the spot price, specifically around 2009, were attributed to the Chinese government’s economic stimulus. Subsequent price increases have been created by a nickel ore export ban from Indonesia in 2014 (partially over-turned in 2017) and again last week. A planned Filipino ban in 2017 never took place.

Nickel’s recent low point came in February 2006, with a price of $8,000/t causing 80% of the industry to lose cash.

However, over the last three years a large, and mostly permanent reduction in supply of over 200,000tpa (particularly Chinese nickel pig iron), and an increase in worldwide demand has caused the nickel market to recover surprisingly quickly. While uncertainty still exists surrounding high global inventories and the government policy in Indonesia and the Philippines, this upwards trajectory has caught the attention of many investors. This is especially true given that by the end of 2020, total market inventories are projected to fall below normalised levels, which paints a very promising picture of an increased nickel spot price.

Reasons to be Excited

If you’ve read any base metals company’s press releases in the last ten years, you will have heard a seemingly indelible torrent of positivity regarding the incoming EV revolution. If the macro is to be believed, the growth of nickel will be propelled. While, at present, nickel’s preeminent use is in stainless steel, an EV revolution would skyrocket the demand of nickel.

2006-18 quantities of nickel use for specific purposes are as follows:

  • 683,000t in stainless steel.
  • 103,000t in batteries.
  • 105,000t for other uses.

However, nickel forecasts for 2018-2030 place use at:

  • 729,000t in stainless steel, a 46,000t increase.
  • 825,000 in batteries, a massive 722,000t increase.
  • 119,000t for other uses, a 14,000t increase.

Nickel now has two growth drivers, batteries and stainless steel, whereas before it was just stainless steel. When investors also account for nickel’s specific importance in batteries, this is even more promising; another metal that is currently crucial for the EV revolution is cobalt which I wrote an article on and you can click here to read. However, because of cobalt’s controversial ethical issues, such as using child labour in the Democratic Republic of Congo, companies have been pressured into signing up to the Responsible Cobalt Initiative. Some high-profile individuals like Elon Musk, and companies like Panasonic, have stated they are actively at work to virtually eliminate cobalt from their batteries. By reducing cobalt in batteries, the beneficiary is nickel; in a recent interview with Crux Investor, Conic Metals explained the development of batteries with as much as eight times more nickel than any other metal in the battery designs, including cobalt.

The Vanadium Redox Flow Battery (VRFB) is yet to become a serious contender in the market because of their excessive weight and the poor ratio of vanadium to electricity stored. Unlike the short high-burst energy of Lithium-ion batteries, VRFB is seen as a means of long-term energy storage to allow for management of peak-flow energy requirements (we will write about this in the next few weeks). At the end of the battery’s life, the Vanadium is reusable for either use in steel or a new battery. Nickel-lithium batteries are a future technological prospect and are predicted to hold more than three and a half times as much energy per pound as lithium-ion batteries, while also enhancing safety.

All the production signs for nickel are incredibly promising, so what about the price outlook?

Price Forecast:

Year Nominal Constant
2018 13,122 13,122
2019 (f) 13,469 13,127
2020 (f) 15,000 14,249
2021 (f) 17,000 15,740
2022 (f) 18,000 16,244
2023 (f) 19,250 16,931
2024 (f) 19,811 17,000
2025 (f) 20,306 17,000
2026 (f) 20,814 17,000
2027 (f) 21,334 17,000
2028 (f) 21,868 17,000
2029 (f) 22,414 17,000
2030 (f) 22,975 17,000

The LME forecasts steady growth in the USD$/t spot price of nickel up until 2030:

In terms of constant 2018 dollars, the nickel price will have to average around $17,000 to incentivise sufficient new capacity to meet increased demand. Moreover, analysts have speculated the capital costs for non-Chinese and non-Indonesian integrated projects may need nickel prices above $25,000 to gain a return. However, increased EV demand is likely to be satiated by these cheaper projects in addition to high-pressure acid leach projects.

Inside Investment Tips

Now you’ve had some insight into the financials of the nickel market, it’s time to hear some crucial inside knowledge that could make or break your investment.

The primary drivers behind the EV hysteria are companies themselves. When you actually dig a little, the truth is the EV revolution is not as close as CEOs would like you to believe. Researchers are also uncertain as to when electric vehicles are going to take over. There are a lot of factors at play and while the trend is towards embracing EV to reduce our carbon footprint, there are still a number of psychological and financial barriers for the consumer to overcome.

The usability of this information will vary based on two things:

A photo of a pile of dollar bills.
  • Your confidence in the EV macro.
  • Your expected speed of returns.

If you have a wholehearted belief in the EV macro, it doesn’t matter if it happens tomorrow, the next day, or in ten years’ time, it is going to happen, and when it does, prices are going to rise. Therefore, if you’re a patient investor with some time to spare and have disposable income that you can afford to wait for a return on, now could be a great time to invest in a nickel company.

However, if you don’t fully buy into the EV thematic, nickel isn’t the commodity for you. Perhaps you foresee a shift in direction when it comes to vehicular transportation, or perhaps you see nickel as a commodity that will become obsolete in batteries after further advancement. Maybe you believe there will be an even longer time scale of 20+ years before EV rises to prominence, in which case many of the companies you might invest in today could have gone under, especially given nickel’s track-record of erratic prices.

Lastly, if you’re an investor looking to make a quick buck, don’t listen to the hype. In Crux Investor’s interview with Conic Metals Corporation (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PWkM9RxFy4), it was clearly laid out that current spot price increases are not due to electric vehicle demand, and are instead generated by asset discovery, general euphoria and the Indonesian export ban on nickel ore. The EV revolution is a few years away at best.

What Nobody is Telling You

…smelting companies will march to their own drumbeat

Some investors might view all the information already mentioned as more than sufficient for them to make an investment decision on nickel. However, there’s an incredibly important secret that big nickel mining companies aren’t letting you in on: the nickel smelters currently have a huge amount of their own raw product on site, and the smelting companies, in many ways, control the market and the ability of public nickel producing companies to forecast. This means nickel mining companies are at their mercy; smelting companies will march to their own drumbeat. 

The Ten Commandments of Nickel Investment

A photo of an open bible with a woodland background.

To conclude this article, here are the ten things to be aware of when investing in the nickel market:

  1. Nickel is a volatile asset; its price is often unpredictable; depending on what type of investor you are, this is either an opportunity or a curse.
  2. The EV revolution is by no means just around the corner. Some say it is two years away from kicking in. Others point towards a longer timescale. However, nobody is disputing its inevitability.
  3. All financial projections point towards a prosperous future for nickel in batteries as there are very few large-scale operations globally; with nickel, scale is king.
  4. China, Indonesia and the Philippines are the foremost producers of lower quality steel, which contains only 1-2% total nickel. Indonesia has just stopped all exports of nickel.
  5. Nickel is almost certain to be central to any evolution generated by electric vehicle demand. Other battery metals (such as cobalt) lack its longevity.
  6. The smelters control the market. Until they can make money, no-one makes money.
  7. Not all nickel companies have the cash or assets to attract capital investment to last until the EV demand commences. Choose your nickel investment carefully.
  8. For the next 12 years, total nickel production is projected to be almost double what it has been for the last 12 years.
  9. As the nickel price recovers a lot of scrap metal will come into the market causing a dip in short-term prices until Q3/20.
  10. Don’t make investment decisions based on sentiment. Look at a company’s management and level of experience. Investigate their assets and potential. Analyse the point in the developmental cycle the company is at (ready to mine, or still exploring). Work out if the company’s priorities are aligned with its shareholders’. Finally, educate yourself fully on nickel by reading this article again and again and again. Oh, and maybe once more for luck.

An Example of a Good Nickel Company:

Examples of nickel companies I feel have great potential are Canada Nickel, Conic Metals or RNC’s Dumont asset. I’ll be writing a full piece on them in the near future; but, for now, happy investing!

  1. https://www.nickelinstitute.org/about-nickel/

Company page: http://www.cruxinvestor.com

If you see something in this article that you agree with, or even disagree with, please let us know in the comments below.

Any advice contained in this website is general advice only and has been prepared without considering your objectives, financial situations or needs. You should not rely on any advice and / or information contained in this website or via any digital Crux Investor communications. Before making any investment decision we recommend that you consider whether it is appropriate for your situation and seek appropriate financial, taxation and legal advice.

A man walks on water, labelled 'This Article,' and pulls a man, labelled 'Your lacklustre investment decisions,' out of the swirling water. A wooden boat with a nickel on its front and full of men watches on in the background.