Vimy Resources (ASX: VMY) – Production in 2 Years with 2.9Mlbs!

Interview with Mike Young, CEO of Vimy Resources (ASX:VMY). Vimy is on a non-deal roadshow in London meeting investors and potential investors. They report that the mood in the market is good because the macro story is well understood.

Mike Young is great value entertainment but he also knows a lot and is very well connected. He does a very good job of explaining the short-term micro and how the financing in the space operates. As well as what is happening with the supply deficit.. Do both sides of the Demand/supply equation understand each other? Mikes doesn’t think so.

Vimy is doing a refresh on the cost-side and they have been talking to debt providers. How are the conversations going? How are they going to market to finance their project? Mike says they are looking for strategic partners, but where? And what does that look like?

Interview Highlights:

  • Mood at The WNA
  • Overview of Vimy Resources
  • DFS: Going to Market and Transport Costs
  • When Will Vimy Resources Go Into Production? When Will We See Contracts Being Signed?
  • Some Juniors Aren’t Going to Make It: Why and How is Vimy Different?
  • Message to Investors

Click here to watch the interview.


Matthew Gordon: You’re here at the WNA Symposium London. What are you here for?

Mike Young: We’re here for the World Nuclear Association Symposium. But we’ve also spent a couple of days on the road with Bacchus Capital.

Matthew Gordon: You’ve been talking to a few institutions, family offices about the potential of raising some money?

Mike Young: Well, it’s called a non-deal roadshow. So basically, what you’re doing is just introducing Vimy to these people in the event at some point the future you might raise money. What’s been good is that the calibre of people we’re seeing is high.

Matthew Gordon: And what’s the mood?

Mike Young: The mood is actually good. I think we’ve come out of a couple of years where the mood’s been bad. And what’s interesting is that the mood of the investors is quite independent of the WNA, because most of these people won’t be at the WNA. But the WNA itself is releasing the WNA Nuclear Fuel Report is the best one that’s come out in the last seven.

Matthew Gordon: But back to these investors.

Mike Young: These investors are people who understand the uranium macro story. Some of them already own uranium shares, and some of the people we saw have small uranium funds. We picked Bacchus Capital on purpose because they did the Yellow Cake float. So, they understand uranium.

Matthew Gordon: So, these investors that you’re seeing, they understood the macro situation, the supply / demand and the economics. What were most of the questions about?

Mike Young: When’s the price going to go up? The constant theme was when are you going to write a contract? They understand the uranium macro. But unless you live in the industry, you don’t understand the micro and there’s a lot of different micros that are pushing in different directions.

Matthew Gordon: Like what?

Mike Young: Well, for example, contracting. I think people expected the Section 232 petition decision to have some sort of effect on the spot price, like it would have in, say, gold, copper, nickel, where there’s a market in a speculative market and it just didn’t. The spot price is basically a reflection of the contracting that’s going on. There was just no contracting. Nobody wrote contracts the day after the Section 232 petition. Now, part of the reason was it was August and it was North America. I mean, the place closes down.

Matthew Gordon: Did you have to explain that to them? Or were they aware of what had been going on there?

Mike Young: A lot of the discussion revolved around exactly how the utilities operate. Why they’re taking their time. The timing and what our expectations were. And as we explained to them, the early contracts aren’t going to be much more than the current term price. And that’s because you’ve got lower cost producers. There’s definitely demand, and we know that open requirement has to be filled.

Matthew Gordon: Well, you say there’s definitely demand, but there’s still timing issues on that. There is no demand today.

Mike Young: No, they’re burning material they bought three years ago.

Matthew Gordon: Demand is coming. The demand story is understood. But did these investors understand that?

Mike Young: No. A lot don’t. A lot of investors are commodity investors. And I made the same assumptions when I started in this space that there’s more immediacy in most other commodities than there is in the uranium.

Matthew Gordon: There’s a lot more understanding of other commodities than uranium?

Mike Young: Correct. And uranium is more like LNG (liquefied natural gas), which are long term contracts. In fact, I was having a discussion in Perth with someone in government and I remember one of the policy advisers say, ‘hey, that sounds just like LNG’. And I went, ‘well, it’s kind of like LNG’. There’s a very small spot market and there’s this time lag. So, I think I think there’s a couple of things at play. People have uranium fatigue. I heard it all before. It’s going to come. It’s going to come. And this is what I mean about the micro. So, some of the things like Yellow Cake, for example, we’ve never seen that before, where a group comes in and buys that much uranium and sequesters it. It’s basically parked. Because they trade on net asset value. You’ve got KazAtomProm which is now Westernised, so two years ago they were behaving…

Matthew Gordon: Partially westernised, surely?

Mike Young: Well, but they still have they still have an accountability to their guidance. They never had before.

Matthew Gordon: Ok, let’s say that’s true.

Mike Young: Well, Riaz Rizvi who’s their chief commercial officer and does the marketing says that’s true. He says that we have to be careful now because we have a responsibility. But not only that, they have westernised their accounting. I mean, when Riaz went in there, they had old Soviet style accounts and they were just churning out the pounds. That’s how they measured it, they weren’t looking at margins. So that’s different. I think the utilities; their buying habits may change. They used to write these 10-year contracts. I think I think that may change. The contract cycles may come down lower. So, there’s a lot of a lot of different things that are interconnected, and some aren’t that are different this time. But the thing is, the Section 232 really focused everyone’s attention here or outside the industry on it, because it was got a lot of airplay. But in terms of the contracting cycle, what will happen over the next 18 months as they fill their forward requirements? The early bird will get the worm, right? The early contracts will get the cheaper prices and they’ll basically climb up the price curve. And because we sit in the third quartile, happily, we’ll be one of the people getting contracts as they creep up the curve and the price increases, because as they continue to write contracts, the lower price material will start to disappear. And as Julian will talk about, the long-term macro. There is a supply deficit. We can see it. We talk about investors not getting part of the or any market. What’s interesting is people in the uranium side don’t get investment side now. What people on the buy side of uranium are missing is just how long it takes to put new production into the marketplace. And that’s really fascinating that both sides don’t quite get the other.

Matthew Gordon: I want to talk about you. You’ve got a couple of assets, Mulga Rock etc. Where are you with those very quickly for people, because I want to talk about them.

Mike Young: Ok, Mulga Rock, DFS finished. We’re looking at a refresh. We want to try and get our capital costs down. Particularly on the mining fleet side. So, there’s S100M there of Australian mining fleet. And we think we’ve got a solution to that. So, we’re working with people on that.

Matthew Gordon: Solution to do what?

Mike Young: In the DFS, we assumed that we would manage and own the mining fleet. Now, that has inherent risk. It’s the cheapest option on paper. But if you have problems in your mining fleet or mining, then it becomes a more significant problem. Whereas you can you can put that risk onto an earthmoving contractor, but you pay a bit more. And it goes onto your operating side. So, things like that, you know, staffing levels, cost of people. 18 months ago, a mine manager was different price than he is today. Things like that. So, we’ve called it a refresh, if you will, that we’re doing that. There’s not much else to do on that. That’s just going to be market driven. So, you know, you get the contracts, you get the debt. We have talked to debt providers on this trip.

Matthew Gordon: This is what I want to talk about. I want to get into the numbers, because you’ve got a couple of good assets. You’re at DFS stage. You know what you’ve got you got a sense what you’ve got your refreshing that. But you’re in this waiting period, this twilight zone, like everyone.

Mike Young: No man’s land.

Matthew Gordon: You’ve now got a sense of the economics of this project. Have you made decisions about how you’re going to go to market? You’ve got lots of options. The DFS tells you a lot of stuff. It doesn’t necessarily mean you’ve got to follow that path as laid out because the market changes, prices change and financing will drive this, the type of financing you get can drive this. You’re having some debt conversations at some point and have some equity partner, strategic partner type conversations too.

Mike Young: We’re having those.

Matthew Gordon: So, tell us about those.

Mike Young: We have put feelers out there saying, if you would like to partner with us coming on as a JV partner.

Matthew Gordon: Where have you gone to?

Mike Young: Everywhere and anywhere you can imagine. China mainly. The US utilities don’t do that. That’s off the table. They just don’t take that risk. They tried it once. They took some shares, but they don’t do that sort of partnership. So, you know, China’s the main one for strategic partners. But we’ve basically started the process of just letting people know that if you’re looking for a strategic partnership, that could be a large equity group, it could be a PE fund. I mean, they do that in gold.

Matthew Gordon: Is this a case of I’m going to hand the keys over this is a strategic partner?

Mike Young: Yes. For example, you earn into 40% of the project through a sale on a fair evaluation and then you have 40% of the offtake.

Matthew Gordon: So where are you with these conversations??

Mike Young: We’re not that far down. In terms of pure debt, we did announce some time ago that we had SOC Gen doing some work for us. Nataxys is now upping their presence in Australia. They’ve just done a merge with a boutique advisement firm. They’re a French bank so they get uranium. We talk to Australian banks all the time. And then there’s some non-traditional style debt here in the city that we’ve said, look, this is our model. We have a minimum contract price. We’ve made it public. It’s fifty-five dollars. We need 55. That’s our floor. We get more. The study was done at 60. The feedback from the utilities is that your price expectations for 2023, when you would likely be in production, are realistic. That’s the feedback. Now, they’re not signing contracts today for that, but they do the maths as well. So, what we do with that is we say, here’s our financial model. Here’s the numbers that we’re inputting. This is the debt we need. And then we sort of flex, how much offtake will you have? Will it be 50%, 75%? And the answer is, well you tell me because you’re lending me the money, we need to know what they payback is. And they’re not things that are announceable. Anybody who understands the space would assume I’m having those conversations.

Matthew Gordon: So, help me understand a little bit of it technically around what DFS has got in it. I imagine it tells you what it’s going to take to get the uranium out of the ground in terms of cost in terms of cost, economics around that. Does it factor in transportation from port to end user? He’s nodding. He says yes. That’s the economics guy.

Mike Young: That’s right. So, he that you’re pointing at, Julian Tapp. He’s sitting way over there because his brain is too big. We couldn’t fit him at the table. So basically, the ownership transfer is at the converter. So, we deliver to the converter and then they take possession and pay us.

Matthew Gordon: And that’s your $55?

Mike Young: Yes.

Matthew Gordon: So how do you do that? Surely it depends where they are in the world and what the cost of getting there right?  Like, you can’t say it’s $55 if you’re selling to China. It’s going to be different price if you’re selling to…

Mike Young: There’s only three places it can go. And that’s France, Blind River Ontario, which it’s delivered at Halifax and then railed.

Matthew Gordon: There’s got to be some variation but not meaningful.

Mike Young: There is a little bit.

Matthew Gordon: I know you’re keeping a really tight ship. You’re not hiring people. You don’t need to hire now, you’ll hire them when you need them. If the price hits $55 and you can get some contracts in place and you can press the big green button, how quick are you to production?

Mike Young: Two years. FID to production is two years.

Matthew Gordon: Build and spitting out product at the other end?

Mike Young: Yeah. So, I think the first year 2.9Mlbs, in year one and then we ramp up to 3.5Mlbs by the end of year two.

Matthew Gordon: So that’s kind of quick into production, there’s no kind of ramp up stage?

Mike Young: To me It’s not. There is a ramp up but it’s because we pre-dig some of the pits and stockpile because the pits will become the tailings facilities. So as part of a build, we actually dig some of the pits and we have stockpiles sitting on the surface so that that assists with your ramp up. So, we’ve got the ore ready to go. So, two years to me, it seems really long, because when I ran that iron ore company, we went from our very first drill hole to ship in four years. Our previous COO, who’s still on our board, Tony Chamberlain, shook his head at me and said, this isn’t an iron ore mine.

Matthew Gordon: He’s right.

Mike Young: I know he is. But, you know, we have to build a camp. The plant’s relatively small. It’s a big mine. It’s 8KM long, 2.5KM across at its widest. We’ll mine it a strip mine. You know, since there’s a lot of dirt to move. But the plant itself is actually relatively small because the front end, we do beneficiation. We wash sand at of the ore, reduce the volume by 50% with no loss in uranium. And so suddenly you’re dealing with a relatively small amount of material.

Matthew Gordon: Relatively compared to a lot of people, two years is a short time just to let you know I haven’t heard anyone today say less. And for some of the juniors who are not producers, it’s three years. So, you’re ahead of the curve there, that’s actually something people should take note of. But what does that tell you in terms of timing for the conversations that you do need to have? I know you’re speaking to utilities, but you can have a different conversation with them today than you will maybe in a year’s time. They’re giving indications about what makes what makes sense to them. But at what point do you actually start talking about contracts?

Mike Young: We’ve been doing that for two years.

Matthew Gordon: No, I mean meaningfully talking about contracts.

Mike Young: Let me let me take you through the process. Let’s go back to our strategy. So, we had to think about where do we want to sell uranium? So, you look around the world, you go, ‘who are the five top countries using this stuff?’. Well, it’s the US, France, China, South Korea and Russia. So, of those five, Korea only buys at spot. And they have some pretty arduous contract requirements, so they’re gone. China and Russia, they’re sourcing their material from the stands. So, they’re not real unless you have a strategic partnership. You’re not going to be selling a lot of material there. And China’s probably going to buy on the spot anyway. So, to be frank, the two countries you want to be looking at are France and US. EDF fuel buyers have told us we’re only going to buy from people in production. So, now you’ve got the US. What’s interesting about that is they’re about 28% of the market. So that’s a big part of the market. So we’re going to do the US. Is there a market for our material? The way the US utilities manage their portfolios is they like to spread the risk and they actually layer cake it. They baseload it with a Cameco and then they’ll actually have these little tranches that are that are absolutely set for juniors from Australia. So, what we did, we went around to all utilities and we said, price being no object, what’s your requirement from Vimy?

Matthew Gordon: Who’s your guy in the states?

Mike Young: Scott Hyman.

Matthew Gordon: He’s full time? You have been thinking about this. You have been having these conversations. You’re readying yourselves.

Mike Young: Correct. And one of the things we’ve addressed previously is our DNA and our overheads. And what was interesting is that conversation came up. What’s your spend? What’s your burn rate? And what we did recently was we had an AGM where we voted. We got permission to do salary sacrifice. The reason for that is I wanted to buy shares in the company, but I don’t want to reward someone for selling them. And this keeps money in the Treasury. And some of our staff, some of our directors have gone to 50%. So that’s one way of saving money.

Matthew Gordon: 50% of what?

Mike Young: Of their salary, they actually receive in shares. So, we’ve done that as a way of saying to people, you can buy shares in the company, but the money stays in the company, which is a really good win-win. It’s a way of saving money. One of the things we had to look at was, how ready do we want to be? To answer your question, when can you push the big green button? You can’t downsize to a point where it’s going to take you two years just to person up again right before you press the button. You want to have your team ready. So, we that’s why we’ve got Scott on board. That’s why we’ve got Julian working part-time. Scott’s working part-time. So, we’ve sort of struck a balance. We downsized the office. We’ve done a lot of cost-cutting, cost savings. We’ve got the team ready to go because this is the sort of market that’ll flip very quickly. One day we’ve got a contract and they’ll cascade.

Matthew Gordon: It may well flip quickly, but the point at which it flips is undetermined at the moment. Today I’ve heard very different views as to where it’s going to go from people inside the industry. And you’d think they would have a bit more of an insight. What’s your take on when this thing starts to motor because some junior companies won’t be able to make it through to the end, because either they need to raise money and can do that, or, because investors are getting better at understanding of the fundamentals of uranium, perhaps that company had their moment in the sun when they could raise money, may not be able to do now.

Mike Young: That’s a really interesting question. And one of the things that Fuel Report does talk about is who is ready. Think of a Formula One race, who’s in grid, who’s in pole. And when you look at that, there’s not very many. And that’s our point of difference. That we have kept the guys on board ready to go. We’ve got no reserve. We’re going through those secondary approvals, the building permits, if you like. Those will be done well before we have all the contracts we need for the debt. My window is the next 18 months. We get contracts and we move into if FID towards the end of next year. That’s my working hypothesis.

Matthew Gordon: We’ve been asking people of the 55 old companies which are around. Do you think many will be around if this thing does go on another 12 months, let alone 18 months? What do you think?

Mike Young: I think some people will fall by the wayside, partly because they were in it for a speculation, not to build a long term mine. And we’re about building a mine and building long term value. When I ran BC Iron that was a $13M listing. And by the time I left, it was a $650M company and it got up to $800M before the iron price fell. We generated a lot of value and that was by getting into production, paying dividends. You just bring on a different class of shareholder. So, we’ve got some major shareholders in Andrew Forest, Sachem Cove, Mike Elkin, Paradise. They’re all there all long. They’re not in this to make a quick buck.

Matthew Gordon: What’s your message to existing shareholders?

Mike Young: Thank you for supporting us and continuing to support us. And we’ve always said this is a long story. And you know, the people that are in, they get that. We’d like to get some share appreciation along the way. That’s what Alligator River does for us. So that’s a shorter-term exploration play with a longer-term development play. So that was part of the reason we brought that in. Because I know through my experience that if you’re building a project, there’s two years of not a lot of news. Isn’t that sexy?

Matthew Gordon: But your point is, so existing shareholders, they’re in it for the long haul. It’s going to be fine. You may get a bump with Alligator River or not, depending on how the market reacts to what’s going on. And it is a question of waiting for this price discovery. That’s the only way you can affect share price, because the reality is it’s out of your control.

Mike Young: It’s existential. Absolutely. Thanks mate.

Matthew Gordon: Good to see you. We love talking to you every single time we speak to you, over here.

Mike Young: Well, hopefully it’ll be more because I hope we get some of these London groups to come in and that’ll give me an excuse to pop by.


Company website: https://www.vimyresources.com.au/

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